Helping Your Child Resist Peer Pressure

Helping Your Child Resist Peer Pressure

Peer pressure is something that we have all experienced throughout our lives.

Peer pressure is when you feel like you have to do something just because all of your friends are doing it, or when others try to influence your decisions or actions.

It is important for parents to make their children aware of peer pressure so that they can recognise when it is happening to them. It is also essential to teach children to say ‘no’ when they feel uncomfortable.

To help your child resist peer pressure, here is some great advice from an independent preparatory school in North London

Spotting peer pressure

woman in black and red dress shirt sitting on bollard at the harbor
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

To help your child fight back against peer pressure, your child will need to be able to spot when it is happening. Explain to your child certain situations where they may experience peer pressure and role play some examples. Teach your child to be sensible and confident in their decision making and reassure them that they can always talk to you if they feel worried or upset.

Saying NO

No text overlay on red background
Photo by Gemma Evans on Unsplash

It is important that your child feels confident enough to say ‘no’ when something makes them feel uncomfortable. It can be extremely hard for your child to say no to their friends, but it is important to explain that true friends will never pressure them to do something they don’t want to do.

Friendships

woman in white and black striped shirt standing on yellow sunflower field during daytime
Photo by Antonino Visalli on Unsplash

Get to know your child’s friends and encourage your child to invite friends to your home. Spend time talking to your child about their relationships at school and if you have any concerns you can always ask their teacher for advice.

Diversity

four person standing beside wall
Photo by Gemma Chua-Tran on Unsplash

By teaching your child to be accepting of other people and to be proud of their own individuality, your child is less likely to be phased by peer pressure. Peer pressure works by making an individual feel wrong or unaccepted for not following along. Explain to your child that we don’t all have to be the same or do the same things in order to fit in. We must respect all races and appreciate the diversity of other cultures.

Helping Your Child Resist Peer Pressure

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.