Alternative Christmas Guide – Oxfam Unwrapped

As we are now in November (just) , we can officially say that it is Christmas next month.  The shops are already filling their shelves with christmas gifts, and I am busy working on my ultimate christmas gift guide to try and help you with choosing that perfect gift.

Alongside my gift guide, I will also be promoting various gifts along the way, and today I am going to start christmas off with alternative christmas gifts.

Oxfam unwrapped, have some great gift suggestions, for that gift that could also change and help lives, and with prices ranging from £5 – £50 there is a budget or everyone.

I have highlighted a few suggestions from their list

  • pileofpoo-patricia-and-family-2-copyright-tommy-trenchardA Pile of Poo – for £9 this gift gives families the means to provide for themselves, by growing fresh vegetables. They will receive the ideal mixture of manure, organic fertiliser and training so that families becomre self-reliant. By growing crops which will feed them regular meals, and enable them to sell and improve their lifestyle.
  •  	Salama (38) and Hama, her baby boy, 9 months at their home in Azel. The father is Agalher, a gardener. 	Azel Treatment centre is a small community health centre, largely dealing with malnutrition cases. Azel has benefitted from OFDA funded water, sanitation, hygiene and nutrition programming (WASH / NUT) The project is one year old, and was started April 2014. 	  	“Hama’s birth was ok, but after I gave birth I didn’t have enough nutrition to give him. He suffered from a fever, diarrhea and vommiting. He would have brief periods of health and then get sick again, so I brought him in to the clinic. He was given paracetemol and rehydration, but 6 months later he was diagnosed with malnutrition. He received special porridge and  responded well – he’s been undergoing treatment for 4 months now. He’s ok at the moment, he looks fine but he’s still sick occasionally. 	  	The availability of the clinic is a great thing for us. Before, we had to get to Agadez town. It was impossibly expensive to travel, then accommodation, food. But now this service is here, it's much more doable. 	  	We are completely delighted to get the water system in our health centre – before it was here we had to go to the neighbouring village to fetch water for going to the treatment centre and it was difficult for the nurse to really look after us. Now, they can wash our babies when they have diarrhea. There’s a laundry system and everything is sanitary. It’s huge progress! 	  	We are really glad about everything that’s been done at this treatment centre – it's really improved our living conditions. 	  	The sensitization sessions are really important - before, people didn’t know the importance of good hygiene to stay healthy. Since the sessions started, we are well informed about hygiene and sanitation. These are changes! Before the sessions people didn’t even seek medical support. Now they come straight to be seen. As soon as any child is sick, I bring them straight in. 	  	I’m able to diagnose the baby myself, at least whether they are malnourished. If you feed him, and he can’t keep food down or  can’t recover from other illnesses then he might have malnutrition, and you need to bring him in. I learned this at the centre in the sensitization sessions. 	  	The community health leader explained to me the kind of food which is nutritious. The problem is Hamadoesn’t eat what I give him, and I don’t have enough food to give him anyway. Even if I feed him healthy vegetables he sometimes throws up. I have to try and feed him fortified porridge. 	There’s solidarity in the village - when there’s no veg in my garden, my neighbour will give me something once or twice. However on the third time, I have to pay, and I don’t have any money. 	  	My great hope is that my baby recovers, grows, studies, and gets a decent job, like for Oxfam. Maybe he’ll become an important person and can afford to take me to Mecca, as a good Muslim! I hope my sons grow up and have several wives, including white ones! 	  	We are really proud of Oxfam because Oxfam helped us women a lot to support our children. We’re really grateful to Oxfam because we’re now really well informed about health issues. We’re really appreciative of your visit too. 	  	I only wish the living conditions in our village would really improve so that our children don’t have to suffer what we suffered.”

    Care for Mums and Babies – for £16 this gift will give maternal health to help mums and babies with healthcare, help provide the means for safe access to water for births and hygiene and give training to new mothers and their communities

  • Picture shows: Aida, daughter of Recelia Alexandre Chiruco, beneficiaries of the Unwrapped project in Mozambique with one of their goats  Oxfam’s programme focus in the Gaza region, being implemented by partners Malhalhe (Early Morning Star) is tackling issues that lead to hunger, working on building sustainable and diversified livelihoods and better supply of clean water.

    A Goat – for £25 this give can provide milk for a family to both drink and to sell, and also the added extra of business training so that the family get the best price for what they produce.  The goat will also help with crops growth.

This is just a few ideas of the great options available from www.oxfam.org.uk.

If like me you get stuck on certain people you have to buy for, I hope this post has given you a few ideas for an alternative present.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for visiting x

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4 thoughts on “Alternative Christmas Guide – Oxfam Unwrapped

  1. What a lovely idea for a Christmas guide, it’s great that you are helping to promote this.

    1. admin

      Thank you, it is a great alternative gift x

  2. I love this idea, Christmas is a time for giving and this gift is perfect!

    1. admin

      It is such a great idea for someone who has everything x

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